IUD or Coil Insertion: What You Need to Know

The IUD is one of the most effective forms of birth control available, with a failure rate of less than 1%. There are two types of IUDs available: hormonal and copper. Hormonal IUDs release a small amount of progestin, a hormone that thickens cervical mucus and prevents sperm from reaching the egg. Copper IUDs, on the other hand, create an environment that is toxic to sperm, preventing fertilization. Both types of IUDs are over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy, and can last anywhere from three to 10 years, depending on the type. If you're considering an IUD, it's important to talk to your healthcare provider to determine which type is best for you.

What Is an IUD or Coil?

An IUD is a small, T-shaped device that is inserted into your uterus by a healthcare provider. There are two types of IUDs: hormonal and non-hormonal. A hormonal IUD releases a small amount of progestin, a synthetic hormone, into your uterus. This hormone thickens your cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach your egg, and also thins the lining of your uterus, making it less likely for a fertilized egg to implant. Hormonal IUDs can last for 3-5 years, depending on the brand.

Non-hormonal IUDs, also known as copper IUDs, do not contain any hormones. Instead, they are made of copper, which is toxic to sperm. This type of IUD can last for up to 10 years. Both types of IUDs are over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly. They are also a great option for people who want a low-maintenance form of birth control, as you don't have to remember to take a pill every day or get a shot every few months.

It's important to note that IUDs do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you should still use condoms or other barrier methods if you are at risk for STIs. Additionally, not everyone is a good candidate for an IUD, so you should talk to your healthcare provider to determine if it's the right choice for you. To learn more, reach out to Elanic Medical in Glasgow and set up your consultation today.

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Types of IUDs or Coils

When it comes to IUD or coil insertion, there are two main types to choose from: hormonal IUDs and copper IUDs. Each type has its own benefits and drawbacks, so it's important to understand the differences before making a decision.

Hormonal IUDs

Hormonal IUDs are a popular choice for many people because they offer a number of benefits beyond just contraception. They work by releasing a small amount of progestin, a synthetic hormone, into the uterus. This hormone thickens the cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach the egg. It also thins the lining of the uterus, making it less likely that a fertilized egg will implant.

Copper IUDs

Copper IUDs, on the other hand, do not contain any hormones. Instead, they are wrapped in copper wire, which creates an inflammatory response in the uterus that is toxic to sperm. This prevents fertilization from occurring. During your consultation, your provider will help you decide which type of IUD is ideal for you after reviewing your medical history and learning about your lifestyle and goals.

How Is an IUD or Coil Inserted?

Before the actual insertion of the IUD or coil, your healthcare provider will perform a physical exam to ensure that you are a good candidate for the procedure. They will also discuss with you the different types of IUDs or coils available and help you choose the right one for you. You may be asked to take a pain reliever or medication to help relax your cervix before the procedure. It's important to let your healthcare provider know if you have any allergies or medical conditions that may affect the insertion process.

The actual insertion of the IUD or coil usually takes only a few minutes and is done in the healthcare provider's office. You will lie on your back with your feet in stirrups, and your healthcare provider will insert a speculum into your vagina to hold it open. They will then use a special instrument to measure the length of your uterus and determine the best position for the IUD or coil. The IUD or coil is then inserted through the cervix and into the uterus.

After Your Procedure

After the insertion, you may experience cramping, spotting, or light bleeding for a few days. It's important to avoid using tampons or having sex for at least 24 hours after the procedure to reduce the risk of infection. Some women may experience mild to moderate cramping during the insertion process, which usually subsides within a few minutes. Your healthcare provider may recommend that you rest for a short period of time before leaving the office.

You should also schedule a follow-up appointment with your healthcare provider to ensure that the IUD or coil is properly in place and to address any concerns or questions you may have. Overall, the insertion of an IUD or coil is a safe and effective method of birth control. However, it's important to discuss the risks and benefits with your healthcare provider and to choose the method that is right for you.

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